Entrepreneurship (ENTR) Courses

ENTR 101. ENTREPRENEURIAL MIND: CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION. This course introduces the student to entrepreneurial thought and the process for innovation and idea generation. Students begin to develop their own entrepreneurial mindset and the business skills essential to the entrepreneurial experience. Students are introduced to the basics of business and challenged to think creatively about forming businesses or designing products to solve customer problems and address unmet needs in the commercial and social arenas. Through experiential learning, case studies, business writing assignments, and creative thinking exercises, students will develop a disciplined thought process for starting and running their own enterprise. This course satisfies the Speaking- Intensive requirement for Entrepreneurship majors. Corequisite: Entrepreneurship 102 for Entrepreneurship majors. All other majors may take the course as an elective without the corequisite.

Fall semester only, three hours.

ENTR 102. TECHNOLOGY FOR THE ENTREPRENEUR. Students learn to use business technologies which are foundational to their educational experience and future business careers, including how to use business information technology, spreadsheets, virtual meetings, key Internet skills such as social networking, and personal information management. This course satisfies the Information Literacy requirement for Entrepreneurship majors. Entrepreneurship majors take this concurrently with ENTR 101.

Fall semester only, one hour.

ENTR 260. INDEPENDENT STUDY. Individual study of specialized topics in Entrepreneurship. Sophomore standing and permission of the department chair and a faculty sponsor are required.

Semester course, one, two or three hours.

ENTR 270. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH. An opportunity to conduct supervised research in Entrepreneurship. Sophomore standing and permission of the department chair and a faculty sponsor are required.

Semester course, one, two or three hours.

ENTR 301. LEAN LAUNCHPAD. The Lean LaunchPad uses the Customer Discovery process and the Business Model Canvas to collapse the infinite possibilities of a startup into a set of solvable problems. Students will be taught how to use the information that they collect from customers to validate and/or invalidate their business model hypotheses. Throughout the course, the teams will modify their business models as they iterate, pivot, and/or restart their ideas. It provides real world, hands-on learning on what it’s like to actually start a company. This class is not about how to write a business plan. It is a practical entrepreneurial lab in which the goal is to create an entrepreneurial experience that includes the pressures and demands of the real world in an early-stage startup within the constraints of the classroom and with a limited amount of time. Students will work in teams, learning how to use a business model to brainstorm and test each critical element of a company. Students will also learn how to develop customers in real business scenarios, testing product viability and authentic demand.

Spring semester only, three hours.

ENTR 302. SALES IN THE STARTUP. The purpose of this course is to understand the theory and practice of sales as it is approached in the environment of a startup business. The class will explore strategic selling methodologies, such as partnership development, channel development, and seminar-based sales, as well as specific sales skills and techniques. Students will learn about the particular challenges of selling in the context of a newly launched business, and they will have the opportunity to meet and interact with sales professionals who have specialized in this sales context. Throughout the course, students will have opportunities to practice their skill and work with a local startup company to develop a strategic plan for a seminar-based sales approach.

Spring semester only, three hours.

ENTR 303. LAW FOR ENTREPRENEURS. This course provides an awareness and basic understanding of the legal issues frequently encountered by entrepreneurs. The course specifically examines the legal issues surrounding the organization, financing, and operations of a company, including ownership structuring, the raising of capital, federal securities requirements and exemptions, determining valuation, intellectual property, board formation, human resources, and exit strategies. Students may not receive credit for both ENTR 303 and BUSA 303 Business Law.

Spring Semester only, three hours.

ENTR 306. ETHICS FOR THE ENTREPRENEUR. Students study the ethical decisions business professionals face in small, family, and corporate business settings. Using a case study format students to analyze selected case studies and then discuss their analysis, with the class. Students will interact with business professionals as they study and analyze “living” cases in which one or more of the parties interacts with the class. Through these discussions students will come to understand what constitutes an ethical issue and the different philosophical, theological, and practical perspectives from which individuals may approach an ethical decision. Students are challenged to begin thinking through and developing their own ethical framework as well as to realize the implications of Christian faith in making ethical business decisions.

Fall semester only, three hours.

ENTR 307. SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP. How might one “do good while doing well?” Social entrepreneurship is an accelerating field of study and practice in today’s world of shrinking governmental services. Students study highly effective non-profit as well as for-profit social enterprises to learn the unique aspects of entrepreneurship used to facilitate meaningful social change. Practitioners of existing successful social enterprises act as guest lecturers and coaches.

Fall semester only, three hours.

ENTR 308. INTERNET CONTENT MARKETING. Students will probe the subject of Internet content marketing as a core discipline for 21st century entrepreneurs. They will learn essential concepts for strategic content development and web-based thought leadership, and will acquire skills for use with practical web applications. Students will engage in a semester-long project using WordPress to publish Internet content for a company or organization, employing techniques learned in a class. The structure of the class will include two teaching sessions per week and a WordPress lab.

Fall semester only, three hours.

ENTR 309. E-COMMERCE. This course will provide a foundation for understanding the essential components of a successful e-commerce system, including e-commerce strategy, target market analysis, search engine optimization, integrated marketing, web usability, payment processing, security, current technologies, data management and fulfillment systems. Case studies and actual business scenarios will be examined in detail, and students will have the opportunity to explore practical applications in the marketplace. Preference given to Entrepreneurship majors.

Fall semester only, three hours.

ENTR 310. SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION. Students will explore the fundamental principles and best practices in the field of search engine optimization. They will learn and develop the essential knowledge and skills required to achieve favorable organic rank in the most important search engines, and will become familiar with and interact with experts in the industry. Case studies and actual business scenarios will be examined in detail. Students will have opportunity to conduct SEO research for small businesses and non-profit organizations in semester-long team projects with other students.

Spring semester only, three hours.

ENTR 312. ENTREPRENEURSHIP: MANAGING A GROWING ENTERPRISE. This course focuses on the strategy and operations issues involved with managing an existing company beyond the startup phase using a global business simulation game. While the course is open to non- entrepreneurship, business, and accounting majors, it presupposes a basic understanding of business functions and language. The core feature of the course is a case study/simulation tied to students’ weekly business decisions involving recognizing opportunities, assessing risk, developing resources, and implementing a course of action.

Fall semester only, three hours.

ENTR 314. ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND THE MISSION OF THE CHURCH. This course explores the relationship between entrepreneurial theory and practice and the execution of church ministry and mission work, with a particular focus on the ways in which entrepreneurship can be employed in the service of Kingdom of God. Students will learn about need identification, opportunity analysis, ministry model development, strategic planning, and reputation building in the context of faith-based organizational experience. Concepts related to ministry launch, growth, development and sustainability will also be addressed throughout the course. Students will apply diagnostic and problem solving skills to case studies, while identifying entrepreneurial strategies to address challenges and opportunities. Students will work throughout the semester in teams to create a strategic plan for a local church ministry or mission endeavor.

Spring semester only, three hours.

ENTR 317. STARTUP FOUNDERS’ DILEMMAS. The early decisions made by the founders of startup organizations can determine the entire future path of a company. In this course, students will explore the types of decisions that founders face and the potential impact of such decisions. They will examine case studies of actual startup companies in detail in order to understand how to avoid common pitfalls and mistakes. Through the examination of the results of a decade of research, including quantitative data on almost ten thousand founders, students will build a strong understanding of these types of decisions and how their consequences can make or break organizations. The specific areas of study will include pre-founding decisions, founding team dilemmas, hires, and investors.

Fall semester only, three hours.

ENTR 328. INTERNET CONTENT MARKETING. Students will probe the subject of Internet content marketing as a core discipline for 21st century entrepreneurs. They will learn essential concepts for strategic content development and web-based thought leadership, and will acquire skills for use with practical web applications. Students will engage in a semester-long project using WordPress to publish Internet content for a company or organization, employing techniques learned in a class. The structure of the class will include two teaching sessions per week and a WordPress lab. Students may not receive credit for both Entrepreneurship 328 and Business 328.

Fall semester only, three hours.

ENTR 330. SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION. Students will explore the fundamental principles and best practices in the field of search engine optimization. They will learn and develop the essential knowledge and skills required to achieve favorable organic rank in the most important search engines, and will become familiar with and interact with experts in the industry. Case studies and actual business scenarios will be examined in detail. Students will have opportunity to conduct SEO research for small businesses and non-profit organizations in semester-long team projects with other students. Students may not receive credit for both Entrepreneurship 330 and Business 330.

Spring semester only, three hours.

ENTR 360. INDEPENDENT STUDY. Individual study of specialized topics in Entrepreneurship. Prerequisites: Junior standing and permission of the department chairman.

Semester course, one, two or three hours.

ENTR 390. STUDIES IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP. Studies in areas of entrepreneurship not fully covered by regular departmental offerings.

Semester course, three hours.

ENTR 408. SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP PRACTICUM. Using case studies, lectures, and hands-on exercises, this course clarifies and illustrates the steps necessary to prepare to launch a social enterprise. Topics include the idea generation, business models, organizational structure, staffing, governance, funding, and measurement of social impact. Over the course of the semester, students will prepare business plans for their own social enterprises. Prerequisite: Entrepreneurship 307 Social Entrepreneurship.

Spring semester course, three hours.

ENTR 409. INTERNET ENTREPRENEURSHIP. This course will explore the foundational principles and essential components for launching a successful entrepreneurial endeavor on the Internet. The course will cover important topics related to Internet Entrepreneurship, including key entrepreneurial models, business concept development, opportunity analysis, advanced search marketing techniques, understanding user behavior, and creating a viable Internet model for Digital Entrepreneurial endeavors. Case studies and existing businesses will be examined in detail. Students will have the opportunity to study the journeys of successful Internet Entrepreneurs, to hear from experts in the field, and to create an original Internet Business Plan in a team with other students. For more information, please visit the Internet Entrepreneurship Class blog.

Spring semester course, three hours.

ENTR 420. MENTORING. This course will help students learn and practice the skills necessary to establish and leverage valuable mentor relationships. The course consists of two dimensions: classroom study and one-on-one discussions with an experienced business leader. Students learn how to identify, establish and work with a mentor, to develop professional networks, to build relationships, and to determine the purpose and value of relationships in the world of the entrepreneur. Students will be prepared for typical mentorship discussion topics, such as a personal value statement, strengths assessment, a personal development plan, ethical leadership, professionalism, meaningful internships/summer jobs and finding one’s calling. The course, designed for junior and senior Entrepreneurship majors, is open to any upper-division non-majors pending space available. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

Semester course, three hours.

ENTR 423. FAMILY BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. An upper-level course that will focus on the dynamic of the family-owned and operated business. Appropriate for students of family businesses or students anticipating working for a family business. Students explore the key management issues facing the family business today—interpersonal relations, succession, business functions of marketing, sales, financial management, etc., in the special context of the unique challenges and opportunities of the family-owned business. Students will hear from and interact with small and family business owners who have agreed to visit classes and share their experiences. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing or instructor’s permission.

Spring semester only, three hours.

ENTR 430. ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE AND VENTURE CAPITAL. This course covers financial skills used by entrepreneurs and venture capitalists from the startup of a venture through its harvest. This includes a wide variety of topics including the financial elements of a business plan, the evaluation of new business opportunities, financial planning, sources of financing at different stages, valuation methods, essentials of security law, and methods of harvesting an investment. Prerequisite: Business 301 Principles of Finance.

Fall semester only, three hours.

ENTR 460. INDEPENDENT STUDY. Individual study of specialized topics in Entrepreneurship. Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of the department chairman.

Semester course, one, two or three hours.

ENTR 466. BUSINESS PLANNING. This course provides students from all majors with a vehicle for turning their business and non-profit ideas into concrete viable business plans. Either as individuals or as teams, students research, create, and present a plan for a viable business or non- profit organization. They are coached by the instructor and may also be matched to an appropriate mentor with experience in their area of interest. Successful completion of this course requires students to participate in the campus-wide business plan competition held during the spring semester. This course satisfies the Writing Intensive requirement for the Entrepreneurship major. Prerequisite: ENTR 430 and a business or non-profit idea.

Spring semester only, three hours.

ENTR 467. CORPORATE HEALTHCARE INNOVATION. In this course, students have a unique opportunity to explore real-world, healthcare-related business concepts in the context of working directly with a major healthcare corporation. A corporate innovation group works directly with Grove City College students each semester, providing students with health-related business and technology concepts that engage the students in terms of research, strategy, innovation and business case development. Students from a variety of disciplines collaborate in groups to explore, define, strategize, and develop the concept. The course utilizes a service learning model, and benefits from the constant support of representatives of the partner company, who regularly attend classes for input and feedback. At the end of the semester, students present their findings and recommendations to corporate executives.

Semester course, three hours.

ENTR 470. INDEPENDENT RESEARCH. An opportunity to conduct supervised research in Entrepreneurship. Senior standing and permission of the department chair and a faculty sponsor are required.

Semester course, one, two or three hours.

ENTR 480. INTERNSHIP IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP. An opportunity for juniors and seniors with a minimum of fifteen hours in their major to participate in individual job experiences, domestic and international, under the supervision of an on-site manager and a department faculty member. Internship must be within an entrepreneurial organization. Products of the internship will include an evaluation by the on-site manager, a log of the internship experience, and a paper describing the experience. A comparison-contrast between academic learning and the internship experience will be conducted. Prerequisite: minimum grade point, permission of department coordinator, and an appropriate job site.

Semester course, one to six hours.

ENTR 488. SEMINAR IN ENTREPRENEURSHIP. An advanced course for junior and senior Entrepreneurship majors to concentrate on specific subject matter to be determined by the instructor. Individual research and extensive oral and written reports are required.

Semester course; one, two, or three hours.